Incentive Taxation
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LVT in Los Angeles? Op-Ed says go for it.
Welcome to the Zany World of NYC's Property Tax
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Part 1, Land Value Taxation: Politics, Persuasion, and Practicality - A How-To
2016: Another Year of Advances and Retrenchment

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Dr. Herbert Barry's Proposal to Really Reassess Allegheny County

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Incentive Taxation

Allegheny County

Pittsburgh: The disappearing Black community and land value














Homewood: A Storied History


In the middle of all the nonstop happy talk about the revitalizing urbanification of older Rust Belt cities likeBuffalo, Cleveland and our old friend Pittsburgh,UrbanTools notes that the benefit falls on a very narrow slice of the body politic: the development "community" and other hustlers who ask that government pays for their slick new condos and apartments for transient Millennials.  Meanwhile, all of these cities are losing population and unemployment rates are still high.

More evidence confirms the error of stopping land value tax in Pittsburgh

Q. What happens when a city taxes buildings more at the beginning of the greatest building boom in American history?
A. Not much.


One of the best examples of the efficacy of land value tax (LVT) was careful study of the city of Pittsburgh culminating in theOates/Schwab study of Pittsburgh published in 1997which concluded all things being equal land value tax policy had the effect of unleashing construction demand – especially downtown construction –just as the steel industry collapsed, and just as the US entered a significant recessionary period (late 1970s and early 1980s)

Pittsburgh: Land Bank proposal needs an endgame

Aproposed land bankin the city of Pittsburgh has been introduced by councilpersonDeb Gross, and a couldn't come soon enough. Pittsburgh has an oversupply of city-owned blighted buildings and lots that suck up revenue, and produce none for the city. Once the land bank comes into operation, one existential question arises: what is the purpose of a bank?

If we take away the word "land", then we know the purpose of a bank is to dispense of assets in order to create a return for both the bank and – in this case – the community.

Urban Tools director casts eye to transit funding in Pittsburgh


Dr.Herbert Barry III, serves the community in many ways, not least of which is his position as a senior director of our parent organization, theCenter for the Study of Economics.  





Dr. Barry recently published abrief essayin the "Pittsburgh Post-Gazette" in support of collecting economic rent in an efficient and just way:

Maximize Value
 
   Articles by Jon Schmitz in the Post-Gazette on June 20 and 21 described a bus rapid transit line in Cleveland. The stories suggest that building a similar line between Downtown and the Hill District and Uptown would generate extra tax revenues for Pittsburgh, Allegheny County, and the School District.

Land Value Tax: The 2013 Rates are in!



















Three Cheers for Pennsylvania Land Value Tax Cities


Because UrbanTools is in Pennsylvania, it should be no surprise that land value tax is most prevalent in the Keystone state. We work all over the country in the world, but Pennsylvania is still "home."  We've been proud to work with these communities, and are grateful that the outcomes have had positive effects and have helped people through hard economic times.

Neighborhoods and Community: How tax policy can be the glue.

Three Cheers for Clairton
UrbanTools' parent, the Center for the Study of Economics is happy to make the theoretical, as well as the empirical case that land value tax helps communities directly to rebound and recohere.
 
In the  American Journal of Economics and Sociology (Volume 71, Issue 4, October 2012)  CSE's Executive Director,Joshua Vincent, demonstrates how, through the adoption of a land-value-taxation in Clairton, Pennsylvania, neighborhood revitalization was realized.

The Planning Paradox: Eds and Meds, Municipal Revenues and Power






















Spreading Like Kudzu


Historic reality: in 1950, Cleveland Ohio had a population ofnearly 1,000,000.  It had a tax base that was compact and served all sectors of the city well.  Great fortunes were made, along with the success of the working and middle classes. From the 1900s to the 1950s,great civic amenitiesbecame possible with this wealth.  John Rockefeller was only the largest source of foundations and gifts that made Cleveland not only a gritty industrial hub, but a place where one could become a more educated, cultured and involved citizen.

Land Value Tax on the Radio Friday March 30



Dr. Herbert Barry of Pittsburgh, an UrbanTools Director has shown his adeptness in outreach to all forms of media, including print and now radio.  Please call in to the radio show on Friday March 30, to participate in this broadcast.




I will be  interviewed on a radio show, on Friday 30 March 2012, 10:00 to 10:30 AM (Eastern time). Listeners can access it at the phone number 1-424-220-1873. The title I chose for the program is"How to remedy our maladaptive sources of government revenue.

Dr. Herbert Barry's Proposal to Really Reassess Allegheny County




UrbanTools got underway as the Henry George Foundation of America in Pittsburgh in 1926.  Through the years, some of the most respected elected officials in Western Pennsylvania such as Pennsylvania Gov. David Lawrence, and mayors Scully and McNair served on our Board of Directors.

During those 85+ years, Pittsburgh and other Allegheny County cities and school districts have utilized land value taxation as a tool to discourage private land banking and to encourage all levels of investment and labor inside municipal boundaries.